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Submitted: 06 Jul 2010
Accepted: 15 Aug 2010
ePublished: 22 Sep 2018
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J Periodontol Implant Dent. 2010;2(1): 17-24.
  Abstract View: 173
  PDF Download: 145

Research Article

Gingival Crevicular Blood for Assessment of Blood Glucose Levels

Fatemeh Sarlati 1*, Elham Pakmehr 2, Kimia Khoshru 2, Nasrin Akhondi 3

1 Associate Professor, Department of Periodontics, Dental Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran
2 General Dental Practitioner, Tehran, Iran
3 Assistant Professor, Department of Management and Accounting, Tehran Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran
*Corresponding Author; E-mail: fatima_sarlati@yahoo.com

Abstract

Background and aims. A high number of patients with periodontitis may have undiagnosed diabetes. It is possible that gingival crevicular blood from routine periodontal probing may be a source of blood for glucose measurements. The aim of this study was to compare gingival crevicular blood and fingerstick blood glucose measurements using a self-monitoring device with the standard laboratory plasma glucose measurement.

Materials and methods. 30 patients with periodontitis and positive bleeding on probing were chosen. Blood samples of two sites were analyzed using a glucose self-monitoring device. In 50 diabetic and 50 non-diabetic patients, after testing fasting plasma glucose (FPG), glucose levels in gingival crevicular blood (GCBG), and capillary fingerstick blood (CFBG) samples were analyzed using the same device.

Results. In non-diabetics, the analysis of agreement failed to prove sufficient agreement between the paired methods (FPG & CFBG, FPG & GCBG, and CFBG & GCBG). In diabetics, this analysis revealed sufficient agreement only between FPG & CFBG, and between FPG & GCBG measurements.

Conclusion. Gingival crevicular blood can be used for testing blood glucose during periodontal examination in diabetic periodontal patients but not in non-diabetic individuals. 

Keywords: Bleeding on probing, diabetes mellitus, gingival crevicular blood
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