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Submitted: 05 Apr 2018
Revision: 20 Jun 2018
Accepted: 30 Aug 2018
ePublished: 10 Oct 2018
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J Adv Periodontol Implant Dent. 2018;10(1): 35-41.
doi: 10.15171/japid.2018.007
  Abstract View: 277
  PDF Download: 168

Research Article

Comparison of Stress and Strain Distribution around Splinted and Non-splinted Teeth with Compromised Periodontium: A Three-dimensional Finite Element Analysis

Reza Amid 1, Mahdi kadkhodazadeh 2, Farshad Dehnavi 3, Mahyar Brokhim 4

1 Associate Professor, Dental Research Center, Research Institute of Dental Sciences, Dental School, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
2 Associate Professor, Dental Research Center, Research Institute of Dental Sciences, Dental School, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
3 Dental Student, Dental School, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
4 DDS, Private Practice, Tehran, Iran

Abstract

Background. Splinting of teeth is performed for effective distribution of loads in mobile teeth and to lower the stress applied to compromised teeth. Biomechanics cannot adequately explain load distribution around natural teeth. This study aimed to compare the distribution pattern and magnitude of stress and strain around splinted and non-splinted teeth with compromised periodontium using three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA). Methods. Six mandibular anterior teeth were scanned and data were registered in CATIA® and then SolidWorks® software programs. The jawbone was also designed. In the second model, the teeth were splinted with fiber-reinforced composite (FRC). The models were then transferred to ANSYS® software program and after meshing and fixing, 100- and 200-N loads were applied at zero and 30° angles. The magnitude and distribution of stress and strain in the periodontal ligament (PDL) and the surrounding cortical bone were determined. Results. A significant reduction in stress was noted in cortical bone around central and lateral incisors while an increase in stress was noted around the canine tooth after splinting. All these changes were more significant under 100-N load compared to 200-N load and greater differences were noted in response to the application of oblique loads compared to vertical loads. Conclusion. Splinting decreased the magnitude of stress and strain in teeth close to the center of splint and increased the stress and strain in teeth far from the center of splint. Adequate bone support of canine teeth must be ensured prior to selection of splinting as the treatment plan for the anterior mandible since it increases the longevity of all the teeth.
Keywords: Stress, Strain, Finite Element Analysis, Periodontal Splinting
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Abstract View: 277

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PDF Download: 168

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